Queen Anne's Lace Photos


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Photos of Wild Carrot

WARNING - Please do not attempt to use pick or touch Wild Carrot unless you can positively identify and distinguish Queen Anne's Lace from poison Hemlock, as Hemlock is extremely poisonous and looks very similar. How to tell - click here; More information here from Purdue Extension (pdf)

Read about the work done on adapting vegetable crops for climate change and how scientists are adapting ancient wild carrots. Here.


The Wild Carrot, Daucus carota, whose common names include wild carrot, bird's nest, bishop's lace, and Queen Anne's lace (North America), is a white, flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe and southwest Asia, and naturalized to North America and Australia. Domesticated carrots are cultivars of a subspecies, Daucus carota subsp. sativus.

The plant is a herbaceous, somewhat variable biennial plant that grows between 30 and 60 cm (1 and 2 ft) tall, and is roughly hairy, with a stiff, solid stem. The leaves are tripinnate, finely divided and lacy, and overall triangular in shape. The leaves are bristly and alternate in a pinnate pattern that separates into thin segments. The flowers are small and dull white, clustered in flat, dense umbels.

 

The Sea Carrot (Daucus carota ssp. gummifer). This one is growing on the Lizard point, Cornwall.

Photo supplied by Brad Fiero Dept. of Biology Pima Community College Tucson, ArizonaTo see the second set of Wild Carrot Photos in the Museum. Click here.

To see a sample of  Peter Sforza's wonderful collection of weeds. Click here.

and http://oak.ppws.vt.edu/~sforza/weeds/dauca.html

This photo (right)  supplied by Brad Fiero Dept. of Biology
Pima Community College
Tucson, Arizona
http://wc.pima.edu/~bfiero/tucsonecology/


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